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  1. 2 points
    Since everybody has different levels of experience with the stock market, it is difficult to have a one-size-fits all objective list. I am going to try to cover all the areas that you should have a firm grasp of by the end of the 3-months. It is a rough outline of what I have learned after 4 months of paper/real trading. This post will be a work in progress, but here goes. ~IN PROGRESS~ Day Trading is probably the most deceiving profession on the planet. On the surface the concept seems very simple: buy low and sell high. Then why is it that 90% of traders fail at his endeavour? Surely they aren't trying to do the exact opposite of what is profitable. Even flipping a coin has better odds at 50%. Let's take a look under the hood to see what is required to be a successful trader. CLASSES There are four classes in total. Each one runs about 1 hour, except for class 4 which is almost 2 hours. It is recommended that you attend the classes multiple times to reinforce your knowledge, refresh the concepts, as well as stay updated on any new material. It is your responsibility to go over the slides and understand what is being taught. If you have any questions, please ask them during class, in the forums, or in the chat. The community is always here to lend a hand. You should also bookmark the Bear Bull Traders FAQ and DAS Trader Pro FAQ. Some members choose to read additional day trading books, as well as practice trading replayed market data. What you get out of the course is directly related to how much effort you put in. In a sense, the entire 3-months is more of a self-paced learning program than a structured course. There are no quizzes, no tests, no projects and no scoring. It is up to you to wake up every morning and spend time in the chair mastering the trade. Nobody will hold your hand, watch over your shoulder, or monitor your performance in any way. That is how day trading is in real life: absolute freedom to stake your fortune or self-destruct and implode. STOCK MARKET BASICS -Warren Buffet once said 'The stock market is a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.' This is true for long term investing and for day trading. Remember that for each transaction you see in the Time/Sales window, there is a buyer and seller. When a stock is down 20% on the day and you short it, somebody is on the other side of that transaction buying. You don't know their hand though. They could be covering their short from earlier, it could be institutions loading up for long term investment, somebody hedging an options contract, etc. Beginners often gloss over this point. Volume represents transactions being filled; a transaction always involves two parties. You are trading against other people, not the market itself. -Exchanges: NYSE, NASDAQ, AMEX -Market Makers -Pre-market and after-hours -High Frequency Trading (HFT), algorithms -Bid, Ask, Spreads -Short-selling. What does it mean. -Short inventory. Why are some stocks shortable and others not -Short Sale Restriction (SSR) -Short interest, or Short Ratio -Share float -5-cent tick programs -Circuit Breaker Halts -News, earnings, and catalysts -Buyouts -Pattern Day Trade Rule >>> Make sure you understand the above prerequisites before proceeding any further. Investopedia is a great resource. CHARTS -Candle Sticks. How to read them. -Understanding Price Action. Bearish vs bullish candles. Indecision candles. -Higher highs and higher lows / Lower highs and lowers lows -1-minute vs 5-minute chart -Moving averages and how they are calculated in different timeframes -VWAP. Why it's an important intraday indicator >>> The above concepts are not tool-specific and apply to all trading platforms MECHANICAL ASPECTS -Knowing your tools (DAS) -Platform, Hotkeys, Scanners, Journaling -Order entry. Limit, market, marketable limit, stops -Level 2 -Calculating commissions and tickets >>> The goal is to familiarize yourself with DAS and be comfortable using it. For some this could take days. For others this requires weeks. TECHNICAL AND STRATEGIES -Finding Stocks in Play -Good vs. bad pre-market price action -Finding Support/Resistance Levels -Day trading Strategies. Master recognizing the patterns, entries, stops, targets. -ABCD / Reverse ABCD -Bull Flag Momentum / Bear Flag -Fallen Angel -VWAP False Break Out -VWAP Reversal -VWAP Trend Trade -Opening Range Breakup / Opening Range Breakdown -Red-to-Green / Green-to-Red -Moving Average Trend Trade -Top Reversal / Bottom Reversal -Time of Day: Open, Late Morning, Midday to Close >>> Everybody will pick this up at a different pace--learning to recognize different strategies, figuring out which one works best for you (at what time of day), etc. MANAGING YOUR ACCOUNT -Risk Management -Position Sizing -Money Management PRACTICE THE PROCESS OF EXECUTING A GOOD TRADE Putting on a trade is more than buying at point A and selling at point B. You need to combine everything you learned to get in and out of a single trade properly: 1) finding good stocks in play 2) identifying chop and staying away 3) identifying the strategy or setup 4) quickly calculating risk-to-reward 5) getting a good entry and avoid chasing/jumping the gun 6) managing the trade based on live price action and new information which the market is providing you 7) taking profit (often overlooked, yet it involves half of the entire trade) 8) you need to do all of the above while keeping your emotions in check and fighting your psychological demons >>> Over the 3-month period, you will repeat this process hundreds of times. This is where the bulk of your time will be spent. Learning to take good trades and improving on your mistakes. This is the only path to consistency. Don't waste time trading unrealistic sizes on low-float stocks because you won't learn a thing. >>>Some of your trades will turn out to be winners, some will turn out to be losers. Most likely you will have a few trades that blow up your practice account (but don't worry, you weren't taking things seriously and would never do it live, right?). GOING LIVE -Choosing a broker -Starting small and gradual position sizing -Returning to Simulator -Peer-to-peer support PSYCHOLOGY OF TRADING -Why do most traders fail here -I'm highly intelligent, analytical and very disciplined. Why this will ruin your trading. -I'm a good poker player. Good--you will be playing against yourself -Revenge -Overtrading -Fear of missing out (FOMO) -Fear of pulling the trigger -Trading scared -Averaging down -Turning a day trade into a swing trade ~IN PROGRESS~
  2. 1 point
    Got the answer in other thread by Soulavenger8. Thanks...
  3. 1 point
    Here you go Hakuna. There's a list on BBT website https://bearbulltraders.com/weekly-practice-history/
  4. 1 point
  5. 1 point
    Hey Billy Jenkins, This is probably what you are looking for. It isn't a complete script, but it should be an easy implementation for your needs. Good luck trading, Bailey Nevener
  6. 1 point
    I have just starting using DAS Trader Pro and am really surprised by the use of an old not scalable type font (MS Sans Serif) in most of the dialogs and some parts of many windows where the font cannot always be reconfigured. This old font does not work with Windows ClearType and so looks jagged and also does not scale as well as TrueType/OpenType fonts. Having used many trading platforms I certainly prefer good functionality over a pretty user interface, but as a software developer I know the changes to update the fonts are very minor, as is another change to enable Windows visual styles which improves the look of Windows controls (edits, check boxes, buttons etc). Hence for my own use I have made a couple of changes to work around this and wonder if anyone else is interested. To show the difference here is part of the configuration dialog before and after the font change and also enabling visual styles: This is at standard 100% scaling in Windows but even with a high DPI (4K) monitor using a higher scaling there is still a difference (one my own 4K monitors I only use 100% or 125%) I did make an enhancement request to DAS support but never heard anything back even to acknowledge receipt. If anyone is interested in making the same changes (at their own risk of course) then let me know and I'll create some instructions and post them here. The changes for the font issue is a Windows registry change and the visual styles for controls is either a Windows registry change or editing the executable (the former is recommended).
  7. 1 point
    Apologies for leaving this thread hanging. With higher DPI monitors the issue of blocky bitmap fonts it less noticeable (but still not ideal) which could explain why some monitors look better than others. Windows DPI scaling has a hand here depending on how its configured. However for those that want to apply the change I mentioned, the change is simple and works system wide, so will make any applications using MS San Serif render with a scalable modern font. I've never experienced an issue from doing for various applications for many years, although theoretically an application could do some odd font metric calculations and display oddly. As a developer myself I can say that would be very odd thing to do as fonts vary with systems anyway but as always take care when editing the Windows registry and do this at your own risk. The change is specifying a font substitution using the mechanism built into Windows. I've attached a zip with two '.reg' registry files (that can be opened in NotePad or other editor to review the change) that will add or remove the change if required by double clicking the file required to run. Note: I could not attach a zip named file directly so added a '.txt' extension that needs to be removed. If you prefer not to run the files, this change can be done by running regedit.exe and then navigating to: Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\FontSubstitutes Right click either the 'FontSubtitutes' item in the tree or empty space in the list on the right and select 'New' and then 'String value'. Name the value 'MS Sans Serif' and set the value to 'Microsoft Sans Serif'. You can choose another font such as Tahoma. After that it is necessary log out of Windows and log back in for the change to take effect. Some more major Windows upgrades can reset these substitutes so the change may need to be reapplied. With reference to the other change for making DAS use modern windows style visual control rendering, this requires editing the DAS Trader executable file or another system wide change. I've found one area of DAS (Trade Signal feature) where this causes an issue so I wouldn't recommend at present. I tested this mainly to see if DAS would have to do much work for the visual style change before I submitted the suggestion to them, and it appears not. RegFilesToAddOrRemoveFontFix.zip.txt
  8. 1 point
    The Money Zone is where 70% of the volume was traded on a given day. It can use it with das trader. Its in the study config/volume by price/config button and check the show volume area box. to use it go to the previous day and mark the value area high, value area low. you can then use the marked area to judge the type trading day for the upcoming session. in this example NIO is opening above vale and above yesterdays range. this signals bullish strength and should have you looking to take a long position if your bias is confirmed. This can also use this with a longer time frame. when we go back 5 days and see NIO has been consolidating. Mark the Money Zone area for this expanded timeframe and you can see after 3 days NIO dropped below the lower value area and quickly bought back up to the top of the value area. the next day NIO sold off in the morning and was quickly bought back up to close above value . This is signaling a possible rejection of value and a possible move to new value ahead. another confirmation of strength in this move is the pivot point relationship. it is an inside value relationship with a narrow pivot range further confirming the possibility of searching for new value. as we can see it didn't even stop to test the value area high before looking for higher value area.
  9. 1 point
    no, that applies only to US and UK IB accounts
  10. 1 point
    if it suits you and you can be consistent with the style then do not change it just now but maybe over the time you will evolve it to something more efficient just naturally. to me 90 executions seems too much to somebody else it might be ok. But if you tend to over-partiall ask yourself next time if you really want these $10 of this partial and pay for it 0,5$ just for the keypress which cost you 5% of the profit
  11. 1 point
    Thanks for the reply, going to switch over. Glad to hear it was worth it!
  12. 1 point
    It's the $150/month plus commissions (I use tiered). When I did it, I transferred my money from TD to my bank, and then from my bank to IB. I did the change about 9 months ago, so worth it!
  13. 1 point
    I am also using Thinkorswim along with TWS for Level 2 and execution. Together they can do the job. The TOS charting is far better than that of TWS and both are free platforms that come with an account.
  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
    Thanks man, I appreciate your answer.
  16. 1 point
    I think it was just a bad break. In hindsight you could have bailed out at the 2nd lower high candle after entry. Looks like you stuck to your play book which is good.
  17. 1 point
    This is my journal
  18. 1 point
    Mike, I am in the Phoenix area and would attend the meetup.
  19. 1 point
    I am interested in this! I live in the PHX area
  20. 1 point
    I have used both DAS and IB TWS. I used DAS for a few months and thought it was great. I went back to TWS to save money and I am able to trade more or less the same way I was on DAS, it's just a bit more awkward with the charts and Level 2. I combine it with TOS which I use just for charting. For me, it's worth it for now to save the money in my monthly budget, but I'll get back to DAS at some point in the future.
  21. 1 point
    It works well as a directional indicator. I use it if it looks like a nice move will happen but you are unsure what direction. Like a breakout or a false break out, and ORB or a reversal, ABCD, etc. If it bounces right on the 50% or the 61.8% line it has a higher chance of being a reversal or ABCD pull back, etc. It gives me about an extra 10% edge. Which in this game is great.
  22. 1 point
    Juard, This is an excellent question haha! I hated it so much when this happened. I had to close the window, open another window, load configuration etc…. it was a nightmare just to avoid getting annihilated on a trade. I actually figured out this answer by accident, and I was so happy when I did! If you press Alt + Space a context menu will appear that will allow you to Restore the window to its regular size. Good luck trading, Bailey Nevener
  23. 1 point
    I made a small application to review my trades and make some statistics about the results of each strategy. I wrote it because I needed some tools to speed up my journaling and to help me reviewing my trades and didn’t find something out there that was exactly personalizable for my style of trading and my way of journaling... Thought that sharing it with you guys would be a way to give back some of the great help that I received from this community! Features The application imports automatically from the DAS logs your trades and displays: The results for each trade and trading day All the entries and exits If you use hard stops based on trigger orders, the risk of the order/trade The risk/reward of the trade, based on the S.L. orders or on a fixed $ amount You can create trading strategies and associate to each trade additional information: The strategy used Whether the setup was valid or not according to the strategy, and if your execution of the strategy was good The theoretical maximum target that could be reached -> based on that the app calculates the maximum result of the trade if you closed your whole position at the max target If the trade is a “playbook trade”, i.e. if you want to add it to the list of your “ideal” trades for this particular strategy You can associate custom tags to the trade You can choose to exclude the trade from the calculations of the daily results and of the statistics You can attach a screenshot from the clipboard, or import it from a file You can add quick comments as well as a detailed review of the trade Based on that, the tool calculates some statistics: Number of trades and global result of the trades in each strategy Number of winners/loosers, percent winners/loosers and average winner/looser in the strategy Average result and average max result of the trades in the strategy Average risk/reward and max risk/reward of the trades in the strategy You can filter the trades for which you want the statistics: Start date/end date Time of day Strategy Direction (long/short) Whether the setup is valid, and whether the execution was good You can select the playbook trades only You can filter the trades by tags You can select only the winner or the looser trades You can filter by trading account You can visualise the equity curve of your trades: You can filter the trades used to calculate the equity curve The equity curve is synchronized with the statistics Screenshots Download Setup: Download and run the installer inside the zip. Once installed, just select the DAS Trader directory and the application will automatically start loading your trades. If you already installed a previous version of the program, the installer will automatically import all your data. In any case you can transfer/backup your data through the Import/Export functions from the File menu. Download link: TradeReview 1.3.1 Setup New in 1.3.0: Equity curve visualization, synchronized with the filters of the Statistics tab Possibility to edit the trade details directly from the table + added context menu for trade exclusion/details Joined the Trades and Analysis tabs (can be reverted through settings) Possibility to filter the trades also by long/short direction Possibility to add some brief comments about the trading day Possibility to import the last DAS screenshot Possibility to visualize more fields in the trades tables Bug fixing New in 1.3.1: Possibility to filter the trades by time of day Trades executed in replay mode are discarded Bug fixing
  24. 1 point
    Summary: To remove all trend lines, you may delete the GlobalTrendline.dat file from the DASTrader Pro folder I recently ran into an issue with DAS Trader Pro where anytime I went to insert a Global Trend Line an error message popped up stating that I had "exceeded" the number of Global Trend Lines allowed. After attempting to remove the lines myself without success, I contacted DAS Support for further advice. The result, all Global Trend Lines can be deleted by opening up your computer's DASTrader Pro folder (downloaded onto the computer from the initial download) and deleting the GlobalTrendline.dat file. Then, simply relaunch DAS and you'll be able to place new trend lines! Hope this helps someone else! Joe
  25. 1 point
    Una de las preguntas más frecuentes de muchos nuevos traders y de personas interesadas en el day trading es cuanto es lo mínimo que deben tener en su cuenta de trading para operar. Este tema de los mínimos para operar está relacionado con la regla del Pattern Day Trader (PDT), la cual es una regulación legal de las autoridades financieras de los Estados Unidos que limita la cantidad de operaciones que se pueden realizar en cuentas con menos de $25,000 dólares. Los traders con cuentas de menos de $ 25,000 dólares que utilizan brókeres con sede en Estados Unidos pueden realizar tres operaciones en un período de cinco días hábiles. Pattern Day Trader es alguien que realiza cuatro o más operaciones dentro de un período de cinco días hábiles: la regla PDT se ha violado y las restricciones de PDT se aplican a esa cuenta. Por lo general, los brókeres restringirán esa cuenta durante 90 días y revocarán el margen, pero algunos brókeres advertirán o bloquearán al trader para que no se realice la cuarta operación. La Regla PDT no se aplica a los traders que utilizan brókeres establecidos fuera de los Estados Unidos. Los brókeres offshore, empresas constituidas y que operan fuera de los Estados Unidos, no están sujetas a esta regla y no hacen cumplir la regla PDT a sus clientes. En resumen, lo que determina la aplicación de la regla PDT es el país de origen del broker: Si utilizas Interactive Brokers USA, donde sea que tengas tu residencia o cual sea tu nacionalidad, te aplicará la regla PDT Si utilizas Interactive Brokers Canadá, la regla PDT no te aplica, por tratarse de una empresa Canadiense. Si utilizas un broker legalmente constituido fuera de los Estados Unidos, la regla PDT no te aplicará. En el caso de Interactive Brokers en los diferentes países donde tenga presencia, tendrás que preguntar si te aplica la regla PDT, pues en muchas ocasiones IB fuera de USA son sucursales de éste país. Es importante que preguntes sobre el margen que te conceden como traders y las comisiones que aplican por operar. Para conocer más de los brokers que recomendamos en Bear Bull Traders visita esta página.
  26. 1 point
    Just wanted to come back and answer my own question on this, in case someone else needs it in the future. You can place alerts more quickly now by clicking on the chart. Steps: 1) Right click on a chart > Chart Area > Config Area. Check the box in the bottom-right that says "Enable placing alert on chart". 2) Next, you must create a hotkey (Setup > Hot Key > Add New Item). I have simple scripts for when price crosses above or below my alert price. I'll share them: Price crosses ABOVE alert price: AlertName=newalert;AlertType=LastPrice;AlertOperator=>=;AddAlert Price crosses BELOW alert price: AlertName=newalert;AlertType=LastPrice;AlertOperator=<=;AddAlert 3) Open the Alerts window (Tools > Alert & Trigger). This window NEEDS to be open for the hotkeys to work, so I now just have it permanently fixed in my Desktop layout. 4) Now, when you press your hotkey, an arrow with an "A" next to it will show up on the chart, and you simply click the price where you'd like the alert to be placed. (NOTE: The first time you click, you'll get an error message that says "Placing alert failed". Just click again and it will work. This is a bug and I've reported it to DAS already.
  27. 1 point
    Mark, Below are my additional rules to trading the ORBs. 1. Do not trade against the trend/gap 2. Do not trade doji ORBs 3. No trades after huge 5min candles 4. Best trades are after price pulls back before breaking the OR 5. No trades in front of big levels (daily, MAs, VVAP etc) 6. No trades on slow movers 7. No trades in the directions of big wicks 8. No trades on choppy stocks 9. Be very selective. Remember it is okay not to take any trades. I used to take trades whenever there was any break of the ORB and had some big winners but also a lot of losers. So I was close to break even. Now with these rules everything has improved. I take way less trades and most of them are winners. I miss a lot of big moves but I am okay with that because I know that a lot of those "big moves setups" would end up being fake outs and at the end I would end up break even. What also changed is that I used to trade anything market threw at me and now I feel like I am in control of what I want to trade and that is very empowering. Hope that helps. Please continue posting it is a great source of knowledge. Thanks Simon
  28. 1 point
    A Alert: brokerage trading platforms offer an alert feature that can be set up to advise a client by text or email that an event, such as a stock hitting a specific level, has occurred. You may be watching this stock and wanting to enter a trade once the specific event has occurred. Algorithm: a proprietary computer program that executes trades based on programed inputs. The inputs could be technical indicators such as moving averages or they could be newswire feeds where computers will trade off of key words or phrases. Ask: the price sellers are demanding in order to sell their stock. It’s always higher than the bid price. Average daily volume: the average number of shares traded each day in a particular stock. I don’t trade stocks with an average daily volume of less than 200,000 shares. As a swing trader, you will want sufficient liquidity to be able to get in and out of the stock without difficulty. At times this term will also be referenced as “average volume”. Average relative volume: this is the number of shares traded in a stock compared to its average daily volume. I like to see stocks with an average relative volume greater than 1.5, which means the stock is trading more than 1.5 times its normal daily volume. This would likely be due to heightened interest by traders and investors in the stock. At times this term will also be referenced as “relative volume”. Average True Range/ATR: how large of a range in price a particular stock has on average each day, taking into account gaps that occur between market sessions. Averaging down: a technique that some traders employ which involves adding more shares to a losing position in order to lower the average cost of that position. They hope the stock will eventually move back in their favor enough so that they can sell and break-even. I do not average down because this may magnify losses. I stick with my trading plan and sell when I hit my stop out price. B Bear: a seller or short seller of stock. If you hear the market is bear, it means the entire stock market is losing value because the sellers or short sellers are selling their stocks. In other words, the sellers are in control. Bearish candlestick: a candlestick with a big filled body demonstrating that the open was at a high and the close was at a low. It tells you that the sellers are in control of the price for the period represented by the candlestick and it is not likely a good time to buy. Figure 7.4 illustrates 2 bearish candlesticks. Beta: the amount an individual stock will move in relation to the market or underlying asset. High beta stocks or ETFs will move more on a percentage basis than the market or underlying asset. Bid: the price that traders and/or investors are willing to pay to purchase a stock at a particular time. It’s always lower than the ask price. Bid-ask spread: the difference between what traders are willing to pay to purchase a particular stock and what other traders are demanding in order to sell that stock at any given moment. It will change throughout the trading day. Traders will refer to a “wide spread” when the bid and ask are far apart. This spread is partly a function of the stock price. For example, a $300.00 per share stock might have a bid-ask spread of $1.00 versus a highly traded $20.00 per share stock where the bid-ask spread would be $0.02. Broker: the licensed company that buys and sells stocks on various stock exchanges based on instructions taken from investors and traders. These instructions can be placed online and directed to the exchanges or taken by an employee at the company which executes the trade. Having an employee place a trade is much less common today versus 30 years ago when it was the only way to buy and sell stocks. Using an employee is also a much slower process compared to trading online. Bull: a buyer of stock. If you hear the market is bull, it means the entire stock market is gaining value because the buyers are purchasing stocks. In other words, the buyers are in control. Bull flag: a type of candlestick pattern that resembles a flag on a pole. You will see several large candles going up (like a pole) and a series of small candles moving sideways (like a flag). After consolidation, the price will break higher. Bullish candlestick: a candlestick with a large body toward the upside. It tells you that the buyers are in control of the price and will likely keep pushing the price up. Figure 7.3 illustrates 2 bullish candlesticks. Buying long: buying a stock with the expectation that its price will go higher. Buying power: this represents the capital in a trader’s brokerage account. Buying power will vary depending on the type of account you have, the broker’s rules on lending if you have a margin account and what you hold in the account such as cash, shares etcetera. C Candlestick: a very common way to chart the price movement of stocks. It allows you to easily see the opening price, the highest price, the lowest price and the closing price value for each time period you wish to display. Chasing the stock: chasing happens when you try to enter a position and the price keeps moving away from your desired entry. For example, you want to go long on a stock at $4.50 per share and the share price keeps moving higher above your bid. As the share price moves higher, you keep entering a higher and higher bid hoping to get filled. This will negatively affect your reward to risk ratio if you chase the price up too far from your desired entry price. Chatroom: a community of traders. Many can be found on the Internet. As a reader of this book, you are welcome to join the BearBullTraders.com chatroom. Choppy price action: occurs when the price of a stock cycles up and down in a range with relatively small movements of price within the cycles. You should try to avoid stocks with choppy price movements and wait for signals that the stock price is ready to move outside of the trading price range. Churning: this refers to a specific type of price movement where a security will not be trending in any direction. Instead, there are small waves of erratic buying and selling with no significant price movement in one direction or the other. Close (“the close”): this refers to the last hour the stock market is open: 3:00 to 4:00 PM ET. Higher levels of volatility or price movements can occur in the last hour of trading. Consolidation period: consolidation usually happens after a sharp move up or down in the price of a stock. Some traders are getting out of their positions while others that missed the move are entering. This fight between the buyers and sellers causes the stock price to pause before resuming the original trend or reversing. D Day trading: the business of trading stocks based on very short-term technical signals. Time frames of 1 minute and 5 minutes are commonly used to find trades. Day traders do not hold any stocks overnight; any stocks they purchase during the day are sold by the end of the trading day. At the close of every trading day, a day trader holds all cash in their accounts. Death cross: occurs when an uptrending stock changes to a downtrend. The death cross event occurs when the faster moving 50-day simple moving average (SMA) crosses the slower reacting 200-day SMA. The 50-day moves from above the 200-day to below it when the cross is made. Doji: an important candlestick pattern that comes in various shapes or forms but are all characterized by having either no body or a very small body. A doji indicates indecision and means that a fight is underway between the buyers and the sellers. Double bottom: a “W” pattern that occurs in a chart when a stock price drops to a low, bounces higher temporarily, and then drops again back to the previous low. On the second dip lower, the buyers take control again, thus moving the price higher. This creates a strong level of support and is an indication that the stock price will likely continue to move higher. Double top: an “M” pattern that occurs in a chart when a stock price rises to a high and then drops back temporarily. The price pushes higher again but fails to make a new high on the second run higher. The sellers then take control again, moving the price lower. This creates a strong level of resistance and is an indication that the stock price trend will likely continue to move lower. E “Either or” order: this is 2 orders that are entered by a trader. The orders are linked so that as soon as 1 of the orders is filled, the other order is cancelled. This allows you to both set a stop-loss to protect from excessive losses and also enter an order at a profit-taking price. Entry point: when you recognize a pattern developing in your charts, your entry point is where you enter the trade. Exchange-Traded Fund/ETF: an investment fund traded on exchanges and composed of assets such as stocks, bonds, currencies and indexes to name just a few. There is a huge variety of ETFs that are available today where you can play almost any sector or tradable asset. Exit point: this is the price where you plan to dispose of all or part of your position in a security. It can be the profit target price or it could be the stop-loss price. You make a plan before taking an entry and you stick to your plan unless there is a good fundamental reason to change the plan. Exponential moving average/EMA: a form of moving average where more weight is given to the closer dates in the moving average period. The EMA will respond more quickly compared to the simple moving average where all prices over the period are given an equal weight. F Flag pattern: a chart pattern that resembles a flagpole and flag. Flag patterns can be bullish or bearish and represent a strong move, followed by a period of consolidation (which forms the flag part of the pattern) and then there is a continuation in the trend. Float: the number of shares in a particular company available for trading. Forex: the global foreign currency exchange market where currencies are traded. All currencies are traded in pairs, such as the US dollar against the Euro. Forward guidance: refers to comments made by a company’s management that is related to how they see business prospects in the future. The companies may provide earnings projections for coming quarters. These remarks are usually made during an earnings report conference call and can have a significant impact on the stock’s future price movement. Fundamental catalyst: some positive or negative news associated with a stock or a sector, such as a US Food and Drug Administration approval or disapproval of a medicine, or a series of hurricanes in the Gulf affecting oil and building supply prices. Futures: futures are a contract that requires the buyer to purchase an asset at a specific price and future date (such as oil, lumber, wheat, currencies). A seller of the futures contract is contracted to deliver that asset at a specific date and price. These financial instruments are highly risky, only used by sophisticated traders and big companies, and often as part of hedging strategies. G Gap down: occurs when a stock closes the previous day at 1 price and opens the next morning at a lower price, leaving a gap between the 2 prices. Small gaps will often happen between trading days and large gaps will happen if there has been some negative news regarding the stock, associated sector or market. Gap up: occurs when a stock closes the previous day at 1 price and opens the next morning at a higher price, leaving a gap between the 2 prices. Small gaps will often happen between trading days and large gaps will happen if there has been some positive news regarding the stock, associated sector or market. Golden cross: occurs when a downtrending stock changes to an uptrend. The golden cross event occurs when the faster moving 50-day simple moving average (SMA) crosses the slower reacting 200-day SMA. The 50-day moves from below the 200-day to above it when the cross is made. H High-Frequency Trades/HFT: a type of trading done by the computers on the various exchanges. These trades are being executed at a very high frequency and often to make tiny gains on price movements in stocks. There’s no need for swing traders to be concerned about this activity because swing trades take place over days, weeks or even longer periods of time. I Illiquid stock: a stock that has a very low volume of shares traded during the day. These stocks can be more difficult to sell and buy and therefore you may not get the price you had hoped to get on entry or exit. The bid-ask spread can also be wider in the absence of higher daily trading volume. Indecision candlestick: a type of candlestick that has a small body and similarly sized high tails and low tails. They are referred to as spinning tops and they usually indicate a fight for control of the price between the buyers and sellers. It’s important to recognize an indecision candlestick because they often indicate a pending price change. Indicator: an indicator is a numeric value produced from a mathematical calculation. The calculation can be based on a stock’s price or it can be based on both price and volume. These numeric values can be used as a gauge of trader and investor sentiment toward a stock or security and are often used to scan the market for trading opportunities. Understanding these indicators can help you find and execute trades. Institutional trader: a trader who works for an investment bank, brokerage firm, mutual fund or hedge fund. Intraday: trading all within the same day, between 9:30 AM and 4:00 PM ET. Investing: investing involves purchasing some asset and expecting it to grow in value in the short term or the long term. Investment account: a regular brokerage account that allows you to trade stocks up to the maximum value of the cash in your account. L Lagging indicator: lagging indicators are indicators that provide you with information based on activity that has already taken place, but they do not provide any guidance for a future event. Leading indicator: leading indicators are indicators that provide some information about what the future could hold. For example, an increase in building permits filed likely indicates higher levels of construction activity. Level 2: a tool commonly used in day trading that will show you buying interest and selling interest (bid and ask) at various price levels. It is not applicable to swing trading. Leverage: the margin your broker provides you based on the capital in your account. The leverage varies between brokers, what you are holding in the account (cash and securities) and share price. Limit order: an instruction you give to your broker to buy or sell a stock at a specific price versus a market order which is filled at the best possible price at that time. There is a chance the limit order will never be filled if the stock price moves away from your order. Liquidity: liquidity means there is sufficient trading volume in a stock for you to be able to enter and exit a trade around where you target. You always want to ensure you can easily get in and out of a trade. Long: being long or “going long” means you have purchased stock in the hope that it will increase in price. For example, “long 100 shares Tesla” means you have purchased 100 shares of Tesla in anticipation of their price increasing. Low float stock: this is a stock with a low supply of tradable shares. Usually, this means less than 10 million shares available for trading. When there is a large demand for shares in low float stocks, their price will rise dramatically due to the shortage of shares available to own and trade. These stocks are typically lower-priced shares and can represent good trading opportunities. M Margin: the leverage or borrowing power your broker gives you to trade with based on the assets (money and stock) that you hold in your account. Margin account: an account that allows you to buy and sell using margin or leverage based on assets held in the account. Margin call: a notification you receive from your broker that the assets in your account no longer meet their lending requirements. This will happen when you have trades that are going against you and the account value is decreasing. Immediate action needs to be taken by adding more cash to the account or exiting some current stock positions. Marketable limit order: an instruction you give to your broker to immediately buy or sell a specific stock within a range of prices that you specify. This helps you to get a fill but not to overpay for an entry. Market cap/market capitalization: a company’s market capitalization is the total dollar value that investors consider a company to be worth. It is calculated by multiplying the share float by the price of the shares. A company with a float of 50 million shares that trades at $10.00 per share is considered to have a market cap of $500 million. Market maker: a broker-dealer who offers shares for sale or purchase on a stock exchange. The firm holds a certain number of shares of a particular stock in order to facilitate the trading of that stock at the exchange. Market order: an instruction you give to your broker to immediately buy or sell a specific stock at the current price offered on the bid or the ask. You get an immediate fill on your order but the price could be subject to volatility and there is a small chance you may not get the entry price that was expected. Medium float stock: a stock with a medium-sized float of between 10 million and 500 million shares. Mega cap stock: a stock with a very large number of shares. For example, Apple Inc. has over 5 billion shares available for trading. Micro-cap stock: a stock with a low supply of shares available to trade at a relatively low price. The market capitalization of the micro-cap stock (also called small cap) ranges between $50 million and up to about $300 million. Mid-day: 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM ET. During this time the market trading volume often drops off a little and then picks up again into the close. Moving average/MA: this is a widely used trading indicator that is calculated by taking past closing stock prices for a certain period and then averaging them over that time. Two commonly used MAs are the simple moving average (SMA), and the exponential moving average (EMA), which gives more weight to more recent prices and therefore reacts more quickly to changes in sentiment. O Open (“the open”): the first one hour the stock market is open: 9:30 to 10:30 AM ET. Trading volume is often higher during this period. Options: a specific type of vehicle for trading. Options are a contract that gives a purchaser a right to buy or sell a security at a certain price by a specific date. They can be used in a number of different trading strategies and are considered to be a more sophisticated trading vehicle. Over-the-counter (OTC) market: the OTC is another venue or way to trade different securities such as less regulated stocks. P Paper trading: this is a technique that can be used by new traders to develop and test their skills before risking their money. You start with an imaginary account and go through the process of scanning and finding stocks for trading. You record the trades that you would take on paper with a plan for an exit (profit or loss). You then monitor the stock and record the profit or loss on the trade after one of your exit points are hit. Penny stock: the shares of companies that trade at lower prices. The share prices are typically under $1.00 per share. Position sizing: refers to how many shares you buy or sell per trade. Recall that you should not risk more than 2% of your account in any one trade. Pre-market trading: regular trading on the stock markets starts at 9:30 AM ET and ends at 4:00 PM ET. Some brokerages will allow traders to trade before the official open and after the close. This is called pre-market and after-market trading. During this period, liquidity is often lower and volatility is much higher. This is not a good time for swing traders to trade. Previous day’s close: this is the closing price of a stock on the previous day. If a stock closes on or near the high of the day, then it may be an indicator that the stock price will continue higher on the following day. Price action: a term that is used by traders to describe the movement in price of a stock. For example, if a stock price is dropping, price action is considered poor and likely a good short opportunity. Profit target: this is the expected exit price of a profitable trade opportunity identified by a swing trader. It is based on reviewing your charts and identifying the reward and risk in each trade. R Real-time market data: real-time market data allows you to see current bid and ask prices as well as last trade price and volume of shares. You need to ensure that you are using real-time data as some sources offer data that can be delayed 15 minutes or longer. Relative Strength Index/RSI: a technical indicator that compares the magnitude of recent gains and losses in the price of stocks over a period of time to measure the speed and change of price movement. Your scanner software or platform will automatically calculate the RSI for you. RSI values range from 0 to 100, with an extreme RSI below 20 or above 80 definitely catching my interest. Retail trader: individual traders who do not work for a brokerage firm or manage other people’s money. Risk management: this is one of the most important skills that a successful swing trader must master. This is done by only entering trades with a good reward to risk ratio, risking 2% or less of your capital on any trade and following your trading plan with stop-losses and targeted profit gains. Risk to reward ratio: this ratio is determined by assessing how much you expect to profit in a trade versus the most that you would be prepared to lose before exiting the position. Good trades offer at least 2 times the reward compared to the risk. For example, if you expect to make a $2.50 per share gain and are prepared to stop out if you lose more than $1.00 per share, then the reward is 2.5 times the risk and it is a good trade from a risk to reward perspective. Rotation: refers to a process where investors and traders move their money from one sector to another. One sector may fall out of favor with investors and they will move their money to another sector that they consider to have a better opportunity for a return on their investment. S Scaling out: a process you use to take advantage of a longer-term trend in a security. Instead of selling all of a profitable position at a target price, you will sell a portion of the position at the first target and hold the remainder for more gains. You should move the stop out price up to a level that is close to the first targeted sell price so gains are not given back. Scanner: software that you program with various criteria in order to find stocks that could be setting up for a profitable trade. Scanners are available on the Internet and are also supplied by some brokerage firms as part of their trading platform. Sector: a sector is considered to be a group of stocks that are all in the same business. For example, the financial sector refers to banks and other financial institutions, with companies such as Wells Fargo, Toronto-Dominion Bank and JPMorgan Chase in that sector. Short: an abbreviated form of “short selling”. It occurs when you borrow shares from your broker and sell them. You are expecting the price of the shares to drop and you are hoping to return the shares by buying them back at a lower price. If you say that you are short IBM, for example, it means you have borrowed and sold IBM shares and are hoping their price goes lower. Short interest: this is the number of shares in a stock that have been reported to be sold short by the brokers. Brokerages are required to report to the exchanges how many shares they have loaned out for short positions. A very high short interest (greater than 20%) is an indication that a lot of investors and traders hold a very negative sentiment toward a stock and the consensus is that the share price is going to go lower. It can also cause a “short squeeze”. Short selling: this occurs when you borrow shares from a broker and sell them with the expectation that the price will go lower and can be bought back at a lower price. You return the borrowed shares to your broker and keep the profit. Short selling restriction/SSR: a restriction placed on a stock when it is down 10% or more from the previous day’s closing price. Regulators at the exchanges place a restriction on short selling of a stock to prevent short sellers from continuing to drive the price down. The restriction only allows a short entry when the price of the stock is going higher. Short squeeze: occurs in a stock where there is a significant short interest. If some positive news comes out about the company, the price may move aggressively higher. Traders who are short get very worried and start buying shares to cover their positions. Combined with the investors and traders buying on the good news, this can create a frenzy of buying which will drive the stock price higher and higher. Short squeezes are bad to be caught in and good to ride higher. Simple moving average/SMA: a form of moving average that is calculated by adding up the closing price of a stock for a number of time periods and then dividing that figure by the number of time periods. As the time period moves forward, the oldest price is dropped and the newest period price is entered to calculate a new value. Simulator: some brokerages offer simulator accounts that start with a set amount of “fictitious funds” or “imaginary money”. You can use the simulator to trade with the imaginary money, allowing you to develop your skills and build experience in trading. This is similar to “paper trading”. Size: the bid-ask information on a stock order page will also likely display the “size” or number of shares being bid for (wanting to buy) and the number of shares being offered for sale. This will change often throughout the trading day on an actively traded stock. Spinning top: a type of candlestick that has similarly sized high wicks and low wicks that are usually larger than the body. They can be called indecision candlesticks and they indicate that the buyers and sellers have equal power and are fighting between themselves. It’s important to recognize a spinning top because it may very well indicate a pending price change. Split adjusted: after a stock split the price will drop in relation to how many new shares were given to current shareholders. A stock may be split more than once if it keeps going higher over time and, with each split, the price will drop. A split-adjusted price is the price a stock would have been before the split or splits. Standard lot: a standard trading size is 100 shares. The “size” column on the stock order page will indicate how many standard lots of shares are being offered for sale or purchase. For example, a bid size of “4” means there are buyers waiting at the bid to purchase 400 shares at the bid price. Stock in play: stocks in play are shares of a company that are being actively traded by traders and investors. They are characterized by higher than normal trading volumes in the shares being traded and by more price movement than previously experienced. Stock split: on occasion a company will want their share price lower to allow more potential investors to buy and own their stock. For example, a stock that trades at $300.00 per share may be too expensive for many investors to own. To address this issue, a company will split the stock so all of the existing shareholders own more shares. In order to do this, they could perhaps offer another share for every one a shareholder currently owns. With twice as many shares in the market, for the value of the company to remain the same the stock price will drop by half. In our example, the share price would drop to $150.00. Stock ticker: short abbreviations of usually 1 to 5 letters that represent the stock at the exchange. All stocks have ticker symbols. Apple Inc.’s ticker, for example, is AAPL. Stop-loss: prior to entering a stock position, you must determine what is the maximum you are prepared to lose on a trade. This level could be based on an indicator or pattern. You enter a position hoping for a profitable trade but if this does not occur then the stop-loss is used as an exit point to protect your capital from greater losses. Support or resistance level: these are areas in a chart where share prices often reverse or pause. There can be areas where resistance to further price increases occur and there are areas where the downward price pressure ends and the share price pauses or moves higher. These areas often repeat, as if the share price has a memory. Swing trading: the serious business of trading stocks that you hold for a period of time, generally from 1 day to a few weeks. Swing trading is a completely different business than day trading is. T Technical analysis: this is an analysis method that is used to forecast the future direction of prices by studying past market data. The data used is primarily price and volume. Trade management: this is what you will do once you enter a trade. You will monitor your position and be prepared to take a profit or get stopped out and take a loss. Trade plan/trading plan: the plan you develop before entering a trade. The plan includes determining an entry price and an exit strategy with a profit target price and stop-loss price. The plan concludes by closing the position and then recording and reviewing the result. Trading platform: this is the software that you use for sending orders to the exchange. All brokers will offer a trading platform. Trailing stop: this is a technique used to stay in a position as it continues to move in your favor. As the trend continues, you move your stop price to trail the move so that when the trend does finally change, you capture most of the profit in the trend. V Volume: the number of shares that are traded during a period of time. The period could be daily, weekly, monthly, etc., or the current volume during the trading day. W Warrant: a right to purchase shares in a company at a specific price. Warrants have an expiry date so they can expire worthless if the actual share price does not move above the purchase price on the warrant. Watchlist: you may build a list of stocks that you are interested in taking a position in. You may very well not be ready to enter at the time the stock first catches your interest and, instead, you are waiting for a confirming event like a bounce off of a double bottom. In this case, you build and maintain a watchlist of potential future trades. The brokerage may also offer an alert feature on their platform so you will be advised when the confirming event occurs.
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