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Johnny_Guinness

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  1. Hello BBT Team! My name is Fred. I am a military veteran working as an analyst in Arizona. I have a bachelor's in biochemistry but switched careers and am working on a master's in global supply chain. I was introduced to trading by some friends who dabbled in Robinhood and Webull. After seeing their eagerness to get rich and failing, I realized that there was more to this business than they made it seem. I come from a family of hard working immigrants who had to hustle their way to America and live the American Dream. Now that I have a family, I want to make sure their financial future is stable. That being said, as discussed in Andrew's book, I am approaching this membership and training opportunities with the same rigor as organic chemistry. This community is unlike many others I scouted. I am eager to learn with everyone, grow with fellow new traders, and wear down the doorsteps of the wise traders to pick their brains and, hopefully, get interactive constructive criticism and advice. Why did I decide to start trading? The more I contributed to my retirement, the more I realized that, one, I was not the one deciding what stocks to invest in (even though I get to choose what retirement plan), and two, I would not get to realize any profits until retirement age. My goals are simple, though the list is long (there is a logical progression to these goals). Start off small, perhaps with CMEG. Develop sufficient fundamental trading skills to the point of them being second nature. Practice frequently with the simulators/paper trading while doing my best to simulate real-world training environment. Prioritize risk management and trade psychology. Finally, become a professional in the field while making considerable profit. I have a list of books I am currently reading that fall into one of three categories: 1. Technical Skills of Trading, 2. Trade Psychology, and 3. General market knowledge and investing. 3 is important because this is a completely new field for me. As an analyst, I don't just push buttons, spit out numbers, and generate reports. As the title implies, I must have a keen sense of analysis and spot trends/patterns to make important decisions. I am approaching trading with the same mentality. Book list: 1. How to Trade for a Living - A. Aziz 2. Technical Analysis of the Financial Markets - J. Murphy 3. The Nature of Risk - J. Mamis 4. Trading for a Living - A. Elder 5. Winning on Wall Street - M. Zweig 6. Trading in Zone - M. Douglas 7. Stock Market Wizards - J. Schwager 8. One Up on Wall Street - P. Lynch 9. The Intelligent Investor - B. Graham Glad to be here, Fred
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